THEATER

“Cold Terror,” chilling tales about human­ity’s struggle against snow and ice, will be performed by the Mysterious Old Radio Listening Society in an online program at 7:30 p.m. Monday, January 25. Presented in the style of a vintage radio broadcast with commercials, music and sound effects, “A Study in Wax” (1953) is a psychological thriller about two Canadian survey workers snowbound in a frigid wilderness, and “Northern Lights” tells of two scientists who discover the gateway to a frozen dimen­sion. Shanan Custer, Joshua English Scrimshaw, Tim Uren and Eric Webster star. The live stream includes introductions and post-show discussions. Tickets are $15. For reservations, visit parksquaretheatre.org.

“Miniatures,” newly commissioned operas by Minnesota artists that run between 8 and 10 minutes, will be streamed from February 5-19 by the Minnesota Opera. The collaborative effort will feature works by Kashimana Ahua and Khary Jackson, Ritika Ganguly and Roshan Ganu, Asoko Hirabayashi and Rebecca Nichloson, and Charlie McCarron and Oanh Vu. The program is free, though donations are welcome. To sign up for digital access, visit mnopera.org.

FILM

Rock Camp: The Musical. Summer camp meets Spinal Tap in this documentary about a rock ’n’ roll fantasy camp where aspiring rock stars from around the world learn how to make music like their heroes. A cultural phenomenon since 1996, Rock Camp boasts a jaw-dropping staff that includes such luminaries as Roger Daltrey, Alice Cooper, Paul Stanley, Gene Simmons, Nancy Wilson, Jeff Beck, Joe Perry and Slash. The movie is available for streaming through January 28. Everyone who buys a ticket will be entered in a contest to win merchandise autographed by a few rock ’n’ roll legends. Tickets are $12. Visit soundunseen.com.

A five-week series of film noir will open with Stanley Kubrick’s early masterpiece, The Killing, at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, February 4, at the Heights Theater, 3951 Central Ave. NE. in Columbia Heights. Sterling Hayden stars in this 1956 film as a long-time crook who plans one last heist with a motley crew made up of a corrupt cop, a former pro wrestler, a bartender, a betting window teller and a loony sharpshooter. Tickets are $12. Masks are required. The auditorium is limited to 25 percent capacity. Seats will be assigned for proper distancing between individual groups. For reservations, visit heightstheater.com.

   

BOOKS

Subtext Books, 6 W. Fifth St., will host free online readings and discussions with authors Charles Baxter and his novel, The Sun Collective, and Matthew Duffus and his book, Dunbar’s Folly and Other Stories, at 7 p.m. Wednesday, January 20. To register for the link, visit subtextbooks.com.

Five poets will recite their verse in a virtual reading at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, January 21. The program is part of the monthly Bridges series hosted by Stan Kusonoki. The word­smiths, who hail from both coasts as well as the Twin Cities, include Alan Walowitz, Betsy Mars, Brett Elizabeth Jenkins, Mikaela Pavlicek and Morgan Kerber-Folstrom. To receive a link for the Zoom program, visit nextchapterbooksellers.com.

Author Robert Mrazek will discuss his best-selling book, The Indomitable Florence Finch, from 10 a.m.-noon Sunday, January 24, in an online program sponsored by Or Emet, the Minnesota congregation for humanistic Judaism. Mrazek is a former congress­man from New York. Finch was a Filipino-American who served in the resistance against the Japanese occupation of the Philippines from 1942-44. She saved the lives of numerous prisoners of war before she was caught and imprisoned by the Japanese. She was rescued by American troops in 1945. To register for the free program, email president@oremet.org.

 

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MUSIC

From salsa to rockabilly, a cappella orches­tration to zydeco, the Ordway will offer five concerts online Fridays through Sundays from January 22 through February 21. Patrons can enjoy one concert each weekend or all five concerts on the same weekend. Tickets are pay-what-you-wish. Featured acts include Stray Cats founder and Bass Player Hall of Fame member Lee Rocker; the a cappella group Naturally 7; the bagpipes, guitars, keyboards and drums of the Red Hot Chilli Pipers; the 11-piece Williamsburg Salsa Orchestra; and MOJO and the Bayou Gypsies. For tickets, visit ordway.org

From the Cellebroederskapel in Maastricht in the Netherlands, Lyra Baroque Orchestra artistic director and harpsichordist Jacques Ogg will perform the music of 17th-century composers Philips, Frescobaldi, Froberger and Muffat in a recital live-streamed at 11 a.m. Saturday, January 23. Tickets are $15, $5 for students. To register for the link, visit lyrabaroque.org.

Four Minnesota artists of renown, harp guitarist Dan Schwartz, jazz guitarist Chris Olson, and finger-style guitarists Phil Heywood and Tim Sparks will perform in a Minnesota Guitar Society program at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, January 23, on the society’s YouTube channel. Each performer will present a solo set. Heywood and Sparks hope to do a set of duets as well. The concert is free, but donations are welcome. For reservations, visit mnguitar.org.

The Minnesota Orchestra continues its winter series of free concerts at 8 p.m. Friday, January 29, with a performance of Bach’s Concerto in C minor and Herbert’s Elegy: In Memoriam on television (TPT MN), radio (99.5 FM) and the internet (classicalmpr.org and minnesotaorchestra.org). Music director Osmo Vänskä will conduct the concert. Principal oboe John Snow and principal second violin Peter McGuire will be the featured soloists.

“Get Grounded on Bach,” an all-Bach concert with two arias, a prelude, a cello suite and a chorale, will be presented online on January 29 and 30 by members of the Lyra Baroque Orchestra. Performers include Jacques Ogg, harpsichord and organ; Julie Elhard, bass viol and violone; Eva Lymenstull, cello and bass viol; Tulio Rondón, cello and piccolo cello; and Sara Thompson, bass and violone. Tickets for the Zoom concert are $10, $5 for students. To register for the link, visit lyrabaroque.org.

Circus Juventas
Emme Martini, 18, rehearses on the aerial silks for Circus Juventas’ winter show, "A Hygge Holiday," which will be presented live and in-person on January 28-31 under the big top at 1270 Montreal Ave. Advanced students of the circus school will play the part of uni­cyc­ling elves, daredevil lumberjacks and amazing acrobats. A host of precautions have been taken to ensure a COVID-safe environment. The 90,000 cubic feet of air in the big top is well-ventilated with HEPA filters and industrial fans. The audience will be limited to 250. Seats are socially dis­tanced, and face masks are mandatory. High-touch areas will be cleaned between shows. Show times are 7 p.m. on Thurs­day, Friday and Saturday and 1 p.m. on Sat­ur­day and Sunday. Tickets are $40, $30 for children ages 3-10. Visit ticketworks.com. Photo by Brad Stauffer

EXHIBITS

Friends of Highland Arts is hanging the original works of local artists in the windows of Highland Park businesses now through February 19. A virtual opening reception for the exhibit, “Sending Hope for 2021,” is tentatively scheduled for 7 p.m. Friday, January 22. For more infor­mation, visit friendsofhighlandarts.org.

“Fire & Ice,” 78 works by regional artists inspired by the properties of the two disparate elements, are being displayed through February 28 at AZ Gallery, an artist cooperative at 308 Prince St. The gallery is open from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. Images of the art may also be seen at theazgallery.org.

With the easing of COVID-19 restrictions, several Twin Cities museums have reopened or will be reopening soon. The Minnesota History Center, 345 W. Kellogg Pkwy., is now open from Thursdays through Sundays but at limited capacity. Timed-entry tickets may be reserved by calling 651-259-3015 or visiting mnhs.org. The Bakken Museum of science, technology and the humanities, 3537 Zenith Ave. S. in Minneapolis, is now open from Tuesdays through Sundays. Reservations are required, and so are masks for ages 3 and older. For information, visit thebakken.org or call 612-926-3878. The Museum of Russian Art, 5500 Stevens Ave. S. in Minneapolis, is open daily. No reservations are necessary. For more information, visit tmora.org or call 612-821-9045. The Minneapolis Institute of Art will reopen at limited capacity on January 28. Timed tickets are required. They are free and may be reserved in advance beginning January 21 by visiting artsmia.org or calling 612-870-3000.

FAMILY

The Children’s Museum of Minnesota, 10 W. Seventh St., has reopened at limited capacity from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Thursdays through Sundays. Reservations are required. Masks are required for children ages 5 and older. Admission is $14.95. Visits are limited to two hours. Strollers are allowed, but elevator usage is limited. Patrons are invited to bring their own water bottles. Call 651-225-6000 or visit mcm.org.

ET CETERA

The League of Women Voters Saint Paul will offer “Journalists’ Perspectives on the 2020 Election” in a free online program from 7-8 p.m. Tuesday, January 26. Panelists include reporters Briana Biersch­bach of the StarTribune, Hana Irkra­muddin of the Minnesota Daily and Bill Salisbury formerly of the Saint Paul Pioneer Press. To register, visit lwvsp.org.

The Twin Cities Jewish Humor Festival, a weekend of laughter, human connection and joy, will be presented from January 28-31 by the Minnesota Jewish Community Center. The virtual festival opens at 7 p.m. Thursday with standup comedy from Israel featuring host Jonathan Gershberg and comedian Benji Lovitt. Queer Comedy Night starring Dana Eagle and guests Lisa Geduldig, Liz Stone and Geulah Finman may be watched at anytime on those days. So may the Night of Jewish Storytelling with Kim Kivens, Avi Aharoni, Galit Breen, Elise Cole, Suzanne Fenton, Gershberg, Jessi Kingston, Judy Victor, and Anthony and Haley Sisler-Neuman. An all-fest pass is available for $18 at tcjhumorfest.org. A workshop for teenagers in writing satire with Anthony Sisler-Neuman will be available at 2 p.m. Sunday for $5. For infor­mation, call Robyn Awend at 952-381-3416.

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