Higher home values come at a hefty price if levies aren’t pared.

Unless the city of Saint Paul, Ramsey County or the Saint Paul Public Schools decides in the months ahead to lower its projected tax levy for 2022, the owners of a median-value home in Saint Paul can expect to see an 11 percent increase in their property taxes next year.

Meeting as the Joint Property Tax Advisory Committee, city, county and school district officials reviewed their respective maximum levies for 2022 and approved a joint maximum levy on September 27.

Truth in Taxation notices will be mailed out to all property owners in Ramsey County between November 10-24 with estimates of their 2022 property taxes should the maximum amounts prevail. Truth-in-Taxation public hearings will be held by each of the governmental jurisdictions in late November or early December.

City Council seeks comment
on St. Paul’s budget for ’22

The Saint Paul City Council will hold a public hearing on the proposed city budget for 2022 at its meeting at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, October 13, at the Como Lakeside Pavilion.

The hearing is being held in addition to the city’s annual Truth-in-Taxation hearing, which will be held in December, shortly before the 2022 budget is adopted. The public can testify in person at the hearing, which is being held outdoors. The meeting will also be streamed live on Facebook.

Citizens are invited to comment on the spending plan at a time when budget decisions are being made. Those who testify will be given two minutes to speak. The City Council is also conducting a budget survey online. It consists of a dozen questions. To access the survey, visit tinyurl.com/nsadfuv6 by November 30.

The prospect of double-digit tax increases is a concern for elected officials. However, the estimated percentage increase for property owners varies greatly from neighborhood to neighborhood. What a property owner actually pays in taxes is based on the value of the property and the change in value from the previous year as reflected by the sale price of comparable properties in the neighborhood and any improvements that were made to the property over the past year.

Ramsey County’s property tax levy will be increasing a maximum of 1.5 percent in 2022. The Saint Paul Public Schools’ levy will be increasing a maximum of 3.15 percent. The city of Saint Paul’s levy will be increasing a maximum of 6.9 percent.

Ramsey County’s property tax levy will be increasing a maximum of 1.5 percent in 2022. The Saint Paul Public Schools’ levy will be increasing a maximum of 3.15 percent. The city of Saint Paul’s levy will be increasing a maximum of 6.9 percent.

The value of the median-priced home in Saint Paul increased 6 percent over the past year—from $215,800 to $228,700. The property taxes on that home will increase $338 or 11 percent in 2022—from $3,079 to $3,417—if the maximum is levied by the city, county and school district.

The median-value apartment building in Saint Paul increased 0.4 percent over the past year— from $1,024,000 to $1,028,100. The property taxes on that apartment building will increase 4.1 percent—from $19,252 to $20,038—under the 2022 maximum levies.

The median-value commercial property decreased 1.1 percent over the past year—from $486,600 to $483,000. The property taxes on that property will decrease 1.2 percent—from $15,876 to $15,687—under the 2022 maximum levies.

What homeowners can expect to see in tax increases.

Homeowners who can expect to see the largest percentage increases in property taxes in 2022 are in those neighborhoods that have been the slowest to recover from the housing market crash and recession of 2007-2008. Those neighborhoods—Dayton’s Bluff, Payne-Phalen, Greater East Side, North End, Frogtown and Sunray-Battle Creek-Highwood Hills—have seen the largest percentage increases in property value over the past year.

The highest percentage increase is in Dayton’s Bluff, where the market value of the median-price home increased 16.5 percent—from $178,500 to $194,700. The property taxes on that home will increase $508 or 25.1 percent—from $2,026 to $2,534—if the maximum is levied by city, county and school district.

Saint Anthony Park is at the other end of the spectrum. The market value of the median-price home there decreased 0.3 percent over the past year—from $390,800 to $389,800. However, the property taxes on that home will increase $207 or 3.5 percent—from $5,987 to $6,194—under the maximum 2022 levies.

Summit-University has seen its median-value home increase by 3.4 percent—from $242,200 to $250,500. The property taxes on that home will increase by $275 or 7.8 percent under the maximum levies—from $3,518 to $3,793.

Summit Hill has seen its median-value home increase by 3.4 percent—from $474,550 to $490,850. Property taxes on that home will increase by $557 or 7.5 percent—from $7,379 to $7,936—under the maximum levies.

The median-value home in Highland Park increased 1.7 percent—from $353,900 to $359,800. Property taxes on that home will increase by $306 or 5.7 percent—from $5,374 to $5,680—under the maximum levies.

The Union Park neighborhoods of Merriam Park, Snelling-Hamline and Lexington-Hamline have seen their median-value home increase by 1.1 percent—from $335,100 to $338,700. Taxes on that home will increase by 5 percent or $251—from $5,062 to $5,313—under the maximum levies.

Downtown’s median-value home increased 1 percent—from $459,800 in 2021 to $464,350. Taxes on that home will increase by 4.8 percent or $354—from $7,134 to $7,479—under the maximum levies.

In the West End, the median-value home increased by 0.6 percent—from $203,400 to $204,700. Taxes on that home will increase by 4.6 percent or $131—from $2,873 to $3,004—under the maximum levies.

Macalester-Groveland’s median-value home increased by 0.3 percent—from $360,00 to $361,550. Taxes on that home will increase by 4 percent or $222—from $5,485 to $5,707—under the maximum levies.

—Jane McClure

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